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Winegrower's Blog

Brian Talley, Vintner
 
August 24, 2012 | Brian Talley, Vintner

Pressing Concerns

Harvest is just around the corner and I thought I this would be a great time to discuss one of the most important pieces of equipment at the winery.  The wine press is used to extract juice (in the case of white wine) or wine (for red) from the grapes.  We have a number of presses at the winery.  Here’s an introduction to each, from smallest to largest.  Winemaker Eric Johnson is in each picture to lend perspective.

Ethan’s Press—this small press belongs to Ethan Etnyre, local doctor, friend of the winery and home winemaker.  His wife Karen gave it to him a few years ago as a gift.  Ethan has determined that he prefers to bring the grapes he grows at his house to Talley Vineyards to be pressed, so we accommodate him.  Consequently, this press doesn’t get much use.  Maybe we’ll use it for a micro batch this year, just for fun.

Traditional Basket Press—This small basket press was recently restored by my friend Stan Shahan, who also happens to be a home winemaker.  It now stands near the front door of the tasting room and is a real showpiece.  Like all traditional basket presses, it employs a steel plate that is ratcheted down from the top, applying pressure to the must (crushed red grapes).  The basket consists of slats of oak.  The wine runs into a steel channel at the bottom, then into a bucket or other small container.

New Basket Press—This is Winemaker Eric Johnson’s pride and joy.  It is the state-of-the-art press used in the production of many of the best red wines produced in the world, including our single vineyard pinot noirs.  It works with the same principle as the traditional wood basket press, though employs a hydraulic ram (as opposed to a hand rachet system).  It is also made of stainless steel.  This press yields beautiful clear red wine with soft tannins.

Europress—This is a tank press.  While the basket press is ideal for red wine production, this is perfect for white wine, especially chardonnay.  All of our chardonnay is whole cluster pressed, which yields clean juice with good acid balance and little phenolic bitterness. Whole clusters of grapes are loaded into the press, through doors at the top.  Inside the press is a giant bag that inflates with air.  The juice runs into the pan at the bottom of the press before being pumped into a tank.  Check out this video on operating the press taken in 2009, back when Eric Johnson, now winemaker, was the enologist at Talley Vineyards. 

Time Posted: Aug 24, 2012 at 9:00 AM
Eric Johnson, Winemaker
 
August 17, 2012 | Eric Johnson, Winemaker

Let the Harvest Begin!

It has begun - Harvest 2012! This week the Talley Vineyards crew picked the first load of Pinot Noir grapes.  The fruit came from West Rincon Vineyard and will be used for a special, top-secret bubbles project.  Even though we picked only a small amount of grapes, the feeling that harvest has begun is unmistakable. 

Harvest is my favorite time of year and I can honestly say it is why I love the wine industry so much.  This time of year is filled with critical picking decisions, mornings that begin long before the sun rises, consumption of massive amounts of coffee, long hours of work followed by very little sleep, hurried meals eaten at odd hours or no meals at all, and a complete lack of a social life. That is harvest in a nutshell and while it might sound like torture, I truly look forward to it.  It is an amazing thing to witness a group of people, everyone from the vineyard crew to the winery crew, sacrifice so much in order to make the best wine possible.

This year we couldn’t have hoped for a better growing season and the fruit looks first-rate.  We will continue to bring in small amounts of Pinot Noir grapes here and there over the next two weeks.  By the time September rolls around, harvest will be rolling as well. The winery will be filled with Pinot Noir fermenters as far as the eye can see and the winery crew will be busy with punch downs. The Chardonnay grapes should be ready to harvest beginning in late September and continuing through October. That will be followed by the Bordeaux grapes we harvest from Paso Robles. If everything goes according to plan, harvest will finally be done by Thanksgiving and everyone will enjoy some hard earned rest.

The 2012 winery crew samples the free run juice from the first pressing of pinot noir grapes.

 

Nicole Bertotti Pope, Assistant Winemaker
 

Grape Sampling

This week we started grape sampling our Pinot Noir blocks in West Rincon and Rosemary’s Vineyards.    Now that we are at nearly 90% veraison (almost all the pinot berries have changed color from green to purple), it’s time to start watching the sugar and acid levels to determine when each block is ready to be harvested.

Our harvest intern, Patrick, spends the early mornings walking the vineyard rows of 10 to 20 different blocks to sample a mix of grape clusters that accurately represent the maturity of each block.  Once the grapes arrive at the winery they go through a mini crusher and are strained into beakers to be tested in the lab.  We measure sugar levels in degrees Brix using a digital densitometer and we measure acidity with a pH meter. Check out our video with our Assistant Vineyard Manger, Travis Monk.

Rosemary’s Vineyard is the furthest along, with a few blocks at 22 Brix and a pH of 3.05, putting us just a couple weeks away from harvest.    Generally we pick our Pinot at around 25 Brix and a pH of 3.4, but our picking decisions are not made just by looking at the numbers.  Flavor maturity, tannin development and visual cues in the vineyard are all key factors in the decision-making before every pick.

Time Posted: Aug 10, 2012 at 10:00 AM
Nicole Bertotti Pope, Assistant Winemaker
 

Anticipating Harvest

It feels like harvest is right around the corner.  Although it will be over a month until the first grapes are picked, you can’t help but feel the buzz and anticipation start to build at the winery.  After bottling the 2011 Bishop’s Peak Chardonnay and Pinot Noir last week, and now blending and aging the rest of the wines until next year, the work on the 2011 vintage is winding down and the preparations for the 2012 vintage have begun. 

New oak barrels have started arriving from our favorite French cooperages, and soon enough we will be dusting off the de-stemmers, presses, and picking bins that have been in hibernation since last fall.  The cleaning tasks are not glamorous and are never-ending, but there is nothing like having a sparkling crush pad and freshly power-washed barrel room to get you (or just me!) excited about bringing in those first grapes of the season.

I think most winemakers can agree that the weeks before harvest bring out all kinds of emotions, from hope to excitement to anxiety.   With how the 2012 growing season is going so far, it looks like there should be nothing but excitement for the grape quality this year.
 

Time Posted: Jul 13, 2012 at 9:34 AM