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Winegrower's Blog

Nicole Bertotti Pope, 2010-2014
 

Watch Bottling at Talley Vineyards

Here is a quick look at the 2011 Rosemary’s Chardonnay traveling through the bottling line.

Anna Heacock, Marketing
 
January 25, 2013 | Anna Heacock, Marketing

Mano Tinta Artist Label Competition

It is my pleasure to announce that this March, Talley Vineyards will be hosting the sixth annual Mano Tinta revolving artist label competition.  For those of you unfamiliar, Mano Tinta is a charity wine produced through a community effort wherein all the grapes, packaging and labor to make the wine is donated and the artwork for the label is created by the local community through this competition.  The vibrant and creative labels from the past few vintages of the Mano Tinta wine have featured a variety of colorful images, all symbolic of the vineyard worker and their craft. 

This competition is open to the general public and will be on display for public viewing and voting in the Talley Vineyards tasting room throughout the month of March.  We encourage local artists of all ages and levels of experience to submit their artwork to the Talley Vineyards tasting room anytime through the end of March.  Submissions must be accompanied by a completed entry form and should be original and meaningful.  The winner will be announced within the first week of April and will have their artwork showcased on the 2010 Mano Tinta label, website, t-shirts and posters.  Entry forms and specific guidelines can be found listed below or by contacting anna@talleyvineyards.com.

Mano Tinta Label Competition Guidelines and Form


The profits raised from the sales of this wine are donated to the Fund for Vineyard and Farm Workers; an endowment created by Brian and Johnine Talley that benefits organizations utilized by the vineyard and farm workers of all San Luis Obispo County.   For additional information about the competition or The Fund For Vineyard and Farm Workers, please call (805) 489-0446 or visit us at www.talleyvineyards.com.

Time Posted: Jan 25, 2013 at 10:12 AM
 
January 18, 2013 |

What is Malbec and Why Does Everyone Love It?

When I think about Talley Vineyards, the grapes that come to mind are of course, pinot noir and chardonnay. When I think about the tasting room, however, I think about a diversity of palates. It is precisely for these palates that we continually produce unique wines. Some of these wines only get produced in one great vintage, such as the West Rincon Pinot Noir or the Ranchita Canyon Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon. Others we continue to produce annually, like our petite sirah. In the most recent vintages, however, we have most definitely taken a liking to the lovely malbec.

In the wine-drinking world, passion for malbec is a recent trend. Malbec originates from France and is one of the five permitted varietals of Bordeaux, though it is certainly not the star there and considered a minor blending component. Most of us, however, think of Argentina when we think of Malbec – probably because you can still get a nice bottle for a relatively inexpensive price. Malbec was brought into Argentina in the mid 1800’s, but it was not until the 1990’s that the wine producers of Argentina decided that it would be their key varietal.  Malbec, according to our winemaker Eric Johnson, is “an awesome grape because it varies heavily based on where it is grown – it can be tannic, soft, fruity, or spicy, or it can be all of that wrapped up into one wine.” I think that the reason why many people love it here, however, is that it often tends towards ripe, juicy aromas and flavors (think ripe blueberry, blackberry, and plums), soft tannins, and moderate acidity. Assistant winemaker Nicole Pope really enjoys the varietal because “it has a distinct fruit profile from all of the other reds we work with, with awesome fresh berry aromas -  even during fermentation.”  While still not widely planted here on the Central Coast, Malbec is a perfect fit in Paso Robles. The fresh, ripe fruit develops during the warm, sunny days, and the cool evenings preserves the acidity that balances the wine.

Here in the tasting room, we now have two delicious wines that feature malbec. The first, our 2010 Bishop’s Peak Malbec, is our first 100% varietal malbec in over fifteen years! This wine is packed with fresh berry characteristics and has soft, elegant tannins resulting from over 20 months in the barrel. The second is our current wine on tap offering which is a 2011 blend of 60% malbec and 40% cabernet sauvignon. This wine, with less time in the barrel, really showcases the ripe fruit of the malbec and compliments it with the peppery spice of the cabernet sauvignon. Come try them side by side!

Maybe it turns out that you’ve read this entire blog and disagree with me because you actually don’t like malbec, and that’s ok! I urge you, however, to stop by the tasting room and give ours a try – after all, there are a lot of other wines here to enjoy as well!

Brian Talley, Vintner
 
January 11, 2013 | Brian Talley, Vintner

New Year, New People

It’s the New Year and we are focused on planning for our 65th year of farming in the Arroyo Grande Valley.  While most of the effort is directed toward things we’ve done many times before, things like pruning, planting schedules and budgets, there are some truly new happenings to announce, especially related to people.

On the vineyard side, I am pleased to announce the appointment of Travis Monk as our new Vineyard Manager.  Travis has worked with us since 2008 when he started in the Tasting Room.  Lucy Parkin was extremely impressed with his work ethic, great attitude and especially his BBQ skills.  After graduating from Cal Poly with a degree in Agricultural Business Management in 2009, Travis joined former Vineyard Manager Kevin Wilkinson as Viticulturalist and was appointed Assistant Vineyard Manager at the end of 2011.  Travis worked closely with Kevin this past year to ensure a seamless transition to his new role.  He oversaw the planting of more than 20 acres of avocados and now turns his attention to the replanting of the Rincon Vineyard, which will start in 2015.  In his spare time, Travis enjoys hunting and golf.  I’ve enjoyed working with Travis and look forward to the new ideas and the commitment to quality that he brings to our vineyard operations.

We’ve added another full time cellar worker in the winery.  Patrick Sigler was one of three harvest interns who helped us during the 2012 harvest.  Pat’s main responsibility was grape sampling, but he proved to be dedicated, conscientious and hardworking in the cellar as well.  Pat just graduated from the Wine and Viticulture program at Cal Poly.  In addition to his studies, he enjoyed much success on the Cal Poly soccer team, scoring the game winning goal against arch rival UCSB in 2011.  Pat was raised in Sonoma County where he was exposed to the wine industry through friends and looks forward to becoming a winemaker someday.

Anna Heacock, Marketing
 
January 4, 2013 | Anna Heacock, Marketing

Restaurant Month in California

As a way to encourage dining out during an otherwise slow time of year, California celebrates January as “Restaurant Month”.  Each participating restaurant creates a generous fixed price menu offering 3 courses for $30. This is a fantastic opportunity to get in on some incredible culinary values, particularly in some restaurants where that’s less than the cost of just one entrée.

I can’t speak for what happens in other counties, but in San Luis Obispo there’s an added bonus of wineries partnering with these restaurants.  In most cases this means that for a small additional fee, the restaurants will offer either a flight of wines or individual glasses to complement each course.  For the most part, these added wine pairings are designed to be as great of a bargain as the meals so you have the chance to taste some incredible, and in some cases rare wines, all for a nominal price.

This brings me to the Talley Vineyards tie-in… I’m in marketing, can you blame me?  We are delighted to share that we are partnered with the fabulous Marisol Restaurant at The Cliffs Resort in Shell Beach. They are well known on the Central Coast for their exquisite food prepared by Chef Greg Wangard in a beautifully scenic location perched right on the cliffs of Shell Beach.  This month only, for $30 you can choose from a large selection of gourmet appetizers, entrées, and desserts for each course that pair perfectly with some delicious Talley Estate wines.  Check out this link to see their complete menu,  but I highly recommend the beef short ribs with our Talley Vineyards Estate Pinot Noir, the best I’ve ever had!

Belinda Christensen
 
December 28, 2012 | Belinda Christensen

Rainbows for 2013

I am usually the one behind our blog posts each week, reminding fellow employees it's time to post, finding photos to add to their words, making suggestions on topics, and getting it up on the website.  This week, with well earned vacations, I thought I would post the last blog of 2012.

As 2012 is almost over and we are about to ring in the New Year, it is time to reflect and at the same time look forward to what 2013 will bring.  On Thursday, which was a sunny and very cool, breezy day, we were surprised by the site of this lovely, bright rainbow displayed across the vineyards and mountains here at Talley Vineyards.  I take it to be a sign that 2013 is going to be a spectacular year!

Wishing you all a year of joy, prosperity and lots of rainbows!  Happy New Year!

 
December 21, 2012 |

A Great Year

With a little over a week left before we celebrate the coming of 2013, I wish everyone a very merry Christmas and a happy New Year! While it is not my style to get sentimental and reminisce about highlights of the year gone past, 2012 is a little bit different. In the most succinct terms possible, it really was a great year.

As it pertains to my life and what I’m passionate about, two amazing things happened this year. First, and most importantly, this is the year I married my amazing wife, Erin. On April 14th, the Talley family was gracious enough to allow us to host our small, intimate wedding ceremony in the barrel room. After six years of dating and now over six months of marrage, I am happy to be able to tell everyone that married life is great!

Secondly, 2012 was an awesome vintage for just about every region of California, especially here on the central coast. While I am proud to have been a part of Talley Vineyards for what has been a really excellent string of vintages (2007-2012), this year is special because it is the first year in a while with both high quality and above-average yields.   Some of you may know that I dabble in wine production.  This is the second year that the Talleys have allowed us to tend a section of vines in Edna Valley and make a small batch of wine. I, my wife, and co-workers, Mike and Ken, harvested twice the fruit as last year and so far we think the wine may be twice as good! Furthermore, now that some of the wines in the barrel room have had a few months of age, we are really starting to see that the Talley chardonnays and pinot noirs are going to be very special wines. 

For a wine geek like myself, there is no better feeling than knowing that I can stock up on the 2012 vintage when they come out and be assured that the quality of the wine is going to reflect the way I feel about the year in which the fruit was grown. Since we have some time before those wines come out, I’m going to go back to my first vintage here at Talley and enjoy a bottle of 2007 Rincon Vineyard Pinot Noir for Christmas. For the rest of you, I suggest that you pull out a great bottle and share some stories with loved ones about the special things that happened in your lives this year. Cheers!

Brian Talley, Vintner
 
December 14, 2012 | Brian Talley, Vintner

Chardonnay Sunset

Regular readers of this blog know that I pay special attention to the weather.   In my line of work, the weather is critically important—rain, heat, frost, fog, and wind all profoundly affect our activities and ultimately the quality of our products. 

Sometimes, especially this time of year, I can simply observe and enjoy the weather and associated phenomena.  Lately, we’ve had a series of beautiful sunsets.  One of my favorite things to do is sit outside with Johnine, watch the sunset over the Pacific and enjoy a glass of wine.  Our daughter, Elizabeth, captured the moment especially artfully this past Sunday evening as we shared some chardonnay.

During the hustle and bustle of this holiday season, I hope you too can sit with those you love and appreciate what makes life so special.  Best wishes for a joyous holiday season!

Anna Heacock, Marketing
 
December 7, 2012 | Anna Heacock, Marketing

A Company Christmas Party, Talley Style

Last night we had our annual Talley staff Christmas party at Giuseppe’s Restaurant in Pismo Beach- and no, the night didn’t end with karaoke.  As you can imagine, this is an exceptionally fun event where we have the amazing opportunity to taste a wide variety of rare, old vintages of Talley single vineyard wines.  Even better, the wines are all from large format bottles which are not only festive, but are known to age better than small format bottles.  The only difficult part is pacing oneself enough to fully appreciate what you’re tasting.

We kicked off the night with a 5 liter bottle of 2001 Rosemary’s Vineyard Chardonnay- which in the words of our direct sales manager Alyssa Ball, “Smelled and tasted rich, nutty, and delicious like a perfectly aged chardonnay”.    I totally agree with her, and I’ll add that it was a wonderful complement to the creamy stuffed mushroom appetizer they were serving.  That bottle disappeared pretty quickly (there were a lot of us), so we moved on to another 5 liter bottle, the 2007 Rincon Chardonnay.  The Rincon was surprisingly fresh and citrusy, showing very youthful.  If you have this wine in your cellar, it is drinking well now, but it definitely has a lot of years left to age.

So, with dinner on the way, we needed to fill our seats and our glasses- this time with a few pinot noirs.  It was a moment I was waiting for, the ceremonious opening of the 9 Liter bottle of 2001 Rincon Vineyard Pinot Noir.  We recently revisited this wine in our library tastings and I remember it scoring top rankings.  The larger format bottle didn’t seem to differ from its 750 ml equivalent.  It had very distinctive earthy characteristics, and the palate was silky and smooth. 

Since I don’t have room to fill in the details about all the wines we shared, I would like to finish with the highlight of my evening, the 1999 Rosemary’s Vineyard Pinot Noir.  This wine had bright and distinctive fruit with perfectly balanced acidity and a silky, tannin structure.  This delicate yet robust pinot noir is still a star after roughly 12 years in bottle. 

Once again, I was reminded of what a wonderful producer we work for.  Even though those incredible wines were all made before my time at Talley Vineyards, it was very special to get to experience these vintages with the family that produced them.

 
Eric Johnson, Winemaker
 
November 30, 2012 | Eric Johnson, Winemaker

Harvest is Finally Over

Harvest is finally over. Well almost over. Theoretically harvest is over because there are no more early mornings and long work days but the lasting effects of harvest are still present.

Looking inside a barrel with malolatic fermentation

Here at Talley we have a certain affinity with native fermentation both primary and secondary. Primary fermentation is just about wrapped up and we are now beginning secondary fermentation called malolactic fermentation. Simply put, we allow the native lactic acid bacteria to convert the malic acid in the wine to lactic acid.  I like to say that malic acid is the apple acid and lactic acid is the milk acid. Malic acid is more acidic and lactic acid is smoother and is less acidic. Because we do not inoculate, our wines, our secondary fermentations tends to take longer. We allow this to happen in the majority of our wines excluding out Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc and Bishops Peak Chardonnay. The majority of our Chardonnays go through a very slow secondary fermentation with most not finishing until late spring and in some years, early summer. 

Special fermentation bung allows gas to escape without letting air in.

So why are we doing this? Well first off we want the malic acid converted to lactic acid for the mouth feel. Secondly, we let malolactic fermentation happen intentionally so it doesn’t happen unintentionally in the bottle when it gets to your house. If you have ever had an “active” fermentation occur in bottle, you know it is not a fun wine to drink. Stale beer comes to mind when I think of this.

I didn’t write this to teach everyone about secondary fermentation but to explain that once the harvest is over, it’s not really over.