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Winegrower's Blog

Andy McDaniel, 2007-2013
 
September 28, 2012 | Andy McDaniel, 2007-2013

How Well do you Know the Tasting Room Staff?

To start, I’ve been told that I have a fluffy and lengthy style of writing – so if you want to get to the meat, scroll down to find a game that could win you a prize!

Continuing the tradition of the most frequently used phrases in the tasting room, my line for this week is “How long have you been at Talley Vineyards?”  I usually can determine that they are asking about me personally, but I like to play dumb and tell people that Talley Farms has been in business since 1948 and Talley Vineyards was established in 1982. “Oh, you meant me personally?” I finally tell them that I’ve been here since the summer of 2007.

Almost everyone that comes in to the tasting room seems to be interested in knowing about their servers, which we encourage by having enough staff so that we can really make connections with our customers. If you are what we jokingly refer to as a “frequent flyer,” you may very well know a little bit about all 18 tasting room attendants. That’s right, 18, and all with very unique personalities.

Below, you will find a column with 8 different tasting room attendants and a column with 8 different facts about each of these attendants. The first to match all 8 correctly will win a private winery and vineyard tour for 4 people! Just cut and paste the table below into an email and send your answers to andy@talleyvineyards.com

Staff Contest - Match the Staff Member to their Fact

1. Sharon 4. Mike 7. Sarah
2. Jane 5. Marian 8. Lucy
3. Bobby 6. Dick  
STAFF  No. FACTS
  A.       Worked for thirty years as a school teacher and gives tours at Talley Vineyards
  B.       Our Tasting Room Manager who has been at Talley Vineyards for over nine years
  C.       One of two attendants who work on Mondays and match their outfits, also our lead tasting room attendant
  D.       Has worked at Talley Vineyards for over 20 years and considered our “tasting room mom”
  E.        One of two attendants who work on Mondays and match their outfits, also our in-house chef
  F.        Runs in marathons including the 2011 Boston and Big Sur Marathons
 

G.       Is a retired doctor and drives to Talley Vineyards weekly from Cambria

  H.       Aspires to be a Brewmaster and brings a new beer for the staff to try almost every Saturday

 

Brian Talley, Vintner
 
September 21, 2012 | Brian Talley, Vintner

2012 Dream Harvest--Perfect weather, a great team and the right tools

So far harvest 2012 looks like a dream come true.  After the vintages of 2010 and 2011, which featured excellent quality, but lower yields, 2012 looks to be one of those very special years that combines exceptional quality and good production, especially for pinot noir.  Best of all, the weather forecast for the next few weeks looks just like what we've had for the past two months--highs in the mid to upper 70s.

While weather is important to the quality of the finished wines, the key role that our production team plays can't be understated.  Winemaker Eric Johnson has been with us 5 years and has come to know the characteristics that make each of our vineyards special and unique.  He is ably assisted by Assistant Winemaker Nicole Pope, Cellarmaster Ignacio Zarate (who just celebrated 30 years in our family farming operations), Nicole Morris and a great team of Cal Poly interns.


The vineyard team is charged with farming our vineyards and ensuring that the grapes are harvested as gently and efficiently as possible.  This team is lead by Vineyard Manager Kevin Wilkinson and Travis Monk, who will assume the role of Vineyard Manager after this harvest. Longtime Vineyard Foreman Daniel Martinez leads a dedicated and experienced vineyard crew during late night and early morning harvests to ensure that the grapes arrive at the winery early and cool.

The final element that will make the wines of 2012 so special is the deployment of the right tools to capture all of the potential quality of the vintage.  These include a state-of-the-art destemmer that very gently removes the grapes from the stems, vibrating tables that allow for careful sorting of clusters and individual berries, and a stainless steel basket press that gently extracts the wine from the skins. 


Perfect weather, a great team, and all the right tools--it all adds up to what I believe will be a very special vintage.

Anna Heacock, 2007-2013
 
September 14, 2012 | Anna Heacock, 2007-2013

Talley Vineyards is in Arroyo Grande Valley, San Luis Obispo County, California

It’s been quite a year for Talley Vineyards in the press.  If you’re our friend on Facebook, follow our Twitter feed or read this blog, I’m sure you’ve seen some of the fantastic accolades our wines have garnered this year.  It seems that there is a consensus in the trade that our wines are “ageworthy”, “world-class” and according to a recent Food and Wine Magazine article, Talley Vineyards is one of the “World’s Most Trustworthy Wineries”.  With all that in mind, I have to pose the question…Why doesn’t anyone know where we’re located?

For the record, Talley Vineyards is located in Arroyo Grande, California.  I get it, Arroyo Grande is a fly-over city, but so was Anaheim before Walt built Disneyland.  I’m not suggesting Talley Vineyards is a destination like Disneyland, but it is a special place. Our terrior, the sense of a place that influences and shapes our wines, has been nationally recognized by some of the most highly regarded names in the wine industry.  With that in mind, I think it’s important that people understand where we are located in order to better appreciate what environmental influences are contributing to our wines. And equally important, so they can visit us!

When most people think of California wine growing regions they think of Napa and Sonoma. Some may know about Monterey and Santa Barbara Counties. The very savvy are familiar with Paso Robles.  But where exactly does that leave Talley Vineyards?  I’ll tell you where.  Halfway between Los Angeles and San Francisco, more specifically halfway between Santa Barbara and Paso Robles, sits San Luis Obispo County’s tiny little coastal town of Arroyo Grande Valley, home of Talley Vineyards, where we grow world class chardonnay and pinot noir.  So next time you hear about Talley Vineyards, we hope you think of us here at home in the Arroyo Grande Valley.

 
Brian Talley, Vintner
 
September 7, 2012 | Brian Talley, Vintner

Harvest Kicks Off

Regular readers of the Winegrower’s Blog might point out that Winemaker Eric Johnson announced the start of harvest in his August 17 post.  Indeed, we harvested two small lots of pinot noir for a rosé and a sparkling wine.  Both of these wines are made in a low alcohol, clean crisp style that calls for harvest much earlier than for our classically styled pinot noir.  Removing these two outliners from the equation, our harvest started about 1 week later than it has over the past 2 years.

If you visit the winery now, you can watch our cellar crew making wine, but you will be hard pressed to see anyone harvesting grapes.  This is because almost all of our harvesting is done at night.  This keeps the grapes as cool as possible and also helps with harvest flow because the first grapes are already at the winery when the winemaking team arrives in the morning.

Many people ask me, “how is 2012?”  It’s a very simple question, but the answer unfolds over time as we gather more information.  Here’s what I can say now.  Because this was a relatively dry growing season, we’ve experienced less mildew and botrytis pressure than normal.  This generally implies better quality.  The crop is about average in size for chardonnay, and above average for pinot noir.  I sum it up as “good quality, good crop.”  We will have a much better idea after we’ve harvested more and the first wines go dry. 

In January, when we conduct our first extensive tastings of the vintage, we can draw more conclusions.  Finally, in the late spring of 2013, we will conduct the tastings that will determine the Single Vineyard Selections and the Estate wines for the vintage.  That’s when I can more definitively answer the question “how was 2012?”

If you want another person’s perspective of our 2010 vintage wines, I invite you to check out the Wine Advocate Reviews that just came out.

Andy McDaniel, 2007-2013
 
August 31, 2012 | Andy McDaniel, 2007-2013

Do You Put Rosemary in the Wine?

I probably shouldn’t include this one in my top ten list of over-used phrases in the tasting room. I hear very similar questions almost every day, about whether the blueberries, strawberries, and buttered biscuit are actually added to the wine. I only include this in the over-used list because lots of people ask just to be facetious, and it certainly doesn’t help that we have tons of rosemary planted in our parking area. When someone asks this question seriously, it’s awesome because it gives me the opportunity to completely enlighten a customer about the world of wine. This is all the more rewarding this time of year because I have the ability to actually show guests the winemaking process from beginning to end without them having to visualize it.

For me, harvest is the time of year when I can give my voice a rest and let the winery do the talking. Harvest tours are perfect for explaining the process because every step is going on at the same time. One batch of pinot noir is being sorted while another is just beginning to ferment. Chardonnay and pinot noir are being pressed, though one is releasing juice from the skins and another is turning into wine. Why stop with the sights and smells? If there is fruit, juice, or wine to be tasted on tours – then we will certainly taste.  How better to learn about fermentation than to taste the juice before, and the wine after? You may ask why malolactic fermentation and barrel aging is important in many wines? Put your glass under the press and catch a little pinot noir on its first day of being wine to find out.

Be careful, however, on harvest tours – you might just be put to work! “Learn by doing” as they say at Cal Poly, is the second best way to learn about wine other than tasting. You might be convinced to do a few punch-downs or even try your hand at sorting clusters. Don’t worry – I won’t make anyone wash any harvest bins or clean out any tanks – we’ll leave that up to the pros. If nothing else, you’ll learn that Rosemary is a person and that none of the herb is used in our wine production.

Brian Talley, Vintner
 
August 24, 2012 | Brian Talley, Vintner

Pressing Concerns

Harvest is just around the corner and I thought I this would be a great time to discuss one of the most important pieces of equipment at the winery.  The wine press is used to extract juice (in the case of white wine) or wine (for red) from the grapes.  We have a number of presses at the winery.  Here’s an introduction to each, from smallest to largest.  Winemaker Eric Johnson is in each picture to lend perspective.

Ethan’s Press—this small press belongs to Ethan Etnyre, local doctor, friend of the winery and home winemaker.  His wife Karen gave it to him a few years ago as a gift.  Ethan has determined that he prefers to bring the grapes he grows at his house to Talley Vineyards to be pressed, so we accommodate him.  Consequently, this press doesn’t get much use.  Maybe we’ll use it for a micro batch this year, just for fun.

Traditional Basket Press—This small basket press was recently restored by my friend Stan Shahan, who also happens to be a home winemaker.  It now stands near the front door of the tasting room and is a real showpiece.  Like all traditional basket presses, it employs a steel plate that is ratcheted down from the top, applying pressure to the must (crushed red grapes).  The basket consists of slats of oak.  The wine runs into a steel channel at the bottom, then into a bucket or other small container.

New Basket Press—This is Winemaker Eric Johnson’s pride and joy.  It is the state-of-the-art press used in the production of many of the best red wines produced in the world, including our single vineyard pinot noirs.  It works with the same principle as the traditional wood basket press, though employs a hydraulic ram (as opposed to a hand rachet system).  It is also made of stainless steel.  This press yields beautiful clear red wine with soft tannins.

Europress—This is a tank press.  While the basket press is ideal for red wine production, this is perfect for white wine, especially chardonnay.  All of our chardonnay is whole cluster pressed, which yields clean juice with good acid balance and little phenolic bitterness. Whole clusters of grapes are loaded into the press, through doors at the top.  Inside the press is a giant bag that inflates with air.  The juice runs into the pan at the bottom of the press before being pumped into a tank.  Check out this video on operating the press taken in 2009, back when Eric Johnson, now winemaker, was the enologist at Talley Vineyards. 

Time Posted: Aug 24, 2012 at 9:00 AM
Eric Johnson, Winemaker
 
August 17, 2012 | Eric Johnson, Winemaker

Let the Harvest Begin!

It has begun - Harvest 2012! This week the Talley Vineyards crew picked the first load of Pinot Noir grapes.  The fruit came from West Rincon Vineyard and will be used for a special, top-secret bubbles project.  Even though we picked only a small amount of grapes, the feeling that harvest has begun is unmistakable. 

Harvest is my favorite time of year and I can honestly say it is why I love the wine industry so much.  This time of year is filled with critical picking decisions, mornings that begin long before the sun rises, consumption of massive amounts of coffee, long hours of work followed by very little sleep, hurried meals eaten at odd hours or no meals at all, and a complete lack of a social life. That is harvest in a nutshell and while it might sound like torture, I truly look forward to it.  It is an amazing thing to witness a group of people, everyone from the vineyard crew to the winery crew, sacrifice so much in order to make the best wine possible.

This year we couldn’t have hoped for a better growing season and the fruit looks first-rate.  We will continue to bring in small amounts of Pinot Noir grapes here and there over the next two weeks.  By the time September rolls around, harvest will be rolling as well. The winery will be filled with Pinot Noir fermenters as far as the eye can see and the winery crew will be busy with punch downs. The Chardonnay grapes should be ready to harvest beginning in late September and continuing through October. That will be followed by the Bordeaux grapes we harvest from Paso Robles. If everything goes according to plan, harvest will finally be done by Thanksgiving and everyone will enjoy some hard earned rest.

The 2012 winery crew samples the free run juice from the first pressing of pinot noir grapes.

 

Nicole Bertotti Pope, 2010-2014
 

Grape Sampling

This week we started grape sampling our Pinot Noir blocks in West Rincon and Rosemary’s Vineyards.    Now that we are at nearly 90% veraison (almost all the pinot berries have changed color from green to purple), it’s time to start watching the sugar and acid levels to determine when each block is ready to be harvested.

Our harvest intern, Patrick, spends the early mornings walking the vineyard rows of 10 to 20 different blocks to sample a mix of grape clusters that accurately represent the maturity of each block.  Once the grapes arrive at the winery they go through a mini crusher and are strained into beakers to be tested in the lab.  We measure sugar levels in degrees Brix using a digital densitometer and we measure acidity with a pH meter. Check out our video with our Assistant Vineyard Manger, Travis Monk.

Rosemary’s Vineyard is the furthest along, with a few blocks at 22 Brix and a pH of 3.05, putting us just a couple weeks away from harvest.    Generally we pick our Pinot at around 25 Brix and a pH of 3.4, but our picking decisions are not made just by looking at the numbers.  Flavor maturity, tannin development and visual cues in the vineyard are all key factors in the decision-making before every pick.

Time Posted: Aug 10, 2012 at 10:00 AM
Andy McDaniel, 2007-2013
 
August 6, 2012 | Andy McDaniel, 2007-2013

“Can I Revisit the Rosemary’s?”

August has arrived in seemingly no time at all, which is great because I look forward to this month the entire year. While summer traffic begins to die down, a whole new crowd descends on our tasting room. They are here to taste our Single Vineyard Pinot Noirs from Stone Corral, Rincon, and Rosemary’s Vineyards.  These three wines, all set to be released on August 25th, represent the best of what each respective vineyard has to offer. If you enjoy the Edna Valley and Estate Pinot Noirs, these wines share the same winemaking style, but with more structure and intensity. I have admitted that it is the Chardonnays here at Talley Vineyards that are my favorites, though I have two reasons to love our pinots – the vast range of food pairings and the even better people watching.

For instance, if you enjoy Chardonnay or Cabernet Sauvignon, how many clones of those varietals can you name? If the answer is none, it may not be that you don’t love your favorite wine varietal as much as “Pinophiles” love theirs. It’s just that while you are drinking your favorite wine, they are spouting off a list of letters and numbers from 2A to 777. Pinot Noir drinkers as a whole tend to want to be more educated more about their wine – they want to know about the punch downs, the cold soak, the yeast, the forests from which the wood for the barrels was harvested. If the last sentences leave you feeling lost, but you want to learn more, visit us for a Harvest Tour to learn all about how we make our Pinot Noirs.

Now to explain my blog title.  Pinot Noir drinkers love the word “revisit,” especially as it pertains to tasting more of one of our most popular wines, our Rosemary’s Vineyard Pinot Noir. This definitely qualifies as one of the “well-used phrases in the tasting room,” although it is rarely said so eloquently. My favorite version: “Can you hit me again with another shot of that Rosemary’s Pinot?”

Whether you are a diagnosed Pinot Noir addict or just appreciate the varietal, visit us on August 25th for our annual Pinot Noir Release Day. We will be featuring a flight of all five of our 2010 Talley Vineyards Pinot Noirs, plus a secret selection from our library in a five-liter format. Not to mention there will be food available for purchase by a great new food truck, Anna Andriese’s Haute Skillet, and music by Doug Groshart of the JD Project. I hope to see you there!

Brian Talley, Vintner
 
July 27, 2012 | Brian Talley, Vintner

Two Kinds of Summer Fun

It’s the middle of summer and there’s lots of fun stuff going on.  I just returned from a wonderful family vacation to San Diego.  This is an annual family get-together that includes the entire extended Talley family.  San Diego has lots of fun things to do:  we visited college campuses, we went to the zoo, we went to Sea World, we went shopping, we hung out by the pool.

We had some wonderful food and wine experiences during the trip.  Highlights included dinner at JRDN at Tower 23 in Ocean Beach.  They pour our Estate Chardonnay by the glass, which is a great match for all the seafood they have on the menu.  Everyone loved Donovan’s, widely regarded as one of the best steakhouses in the United States.  2009 Rincon Vineyard Pinot Noir and prime New York steak is a great pairing.  The biggest revelation was dinner at the Marina Kitchen, the signature restaurant at the Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina.  Beverage Manager Josh Orr is a Cal Poly graduate who started in the wine industry in San Luis Obispo before moving to Las Vegas where he met chef Seth Aaron.  The combination of a well selected and well priced wine list, and “modern comfort food” featuring local sustainable food, was unbeatable.  We finished the evening with a fireworks display over the marina and the signature Makers Mark Milkshake with fresh baked oatmeal chocolate chip cookies.  Three generations of Talleys were in heaven after that dinner!
Closer to home, veraison makes for fun in the vineyard.  This is the time of year when the grapes change color and begin to accumulate sugar.  Its our signal that harvest is just around the corner.  To learn more about veraison, check out my short video  on the subject.

Best wishes for a great summer to you!

Time Posted: Jul 27, 2012 at 2:30 PM