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Winegrower's Blog

Brian Talley, Vintner
 
June 14, 2013 | Brian Talley, Vintner

Visiting a Cooperage in France

Join Brian Talley and winemaker, Eric Johnson, as they visit a cooperage in France.

Nicole Bertotti Pope, 2010-2014
 

Bottling Pinot Noir and Single Vineyard Chardonnay

It’s that time of year again.  The winery seems to move into hibernation mode after harvest, with the 2012 wines aging in barrel and the vines dormant.  And then the bottling line gets started up and the clanking of bottles begins.  To be honest, bottling days don’t usually rank high as a favorite winemaking activity among winemakers and production staff.  The stringent quality control guidelines, repetitive work, and endless bottling line repairs and adjustments just can’t compete with the fun of harvest days, fermentations, tastings, blend trials, and all that other good stuff we get to call work. 

Bottles before the labels Bottles after the labels

The bright side of bottling is that we are always excited to see our finished wines going into bottle. It is the point when the wines leave our hands to begin the bottle aging process and eventually be released to the public. Last week was an especially enjoyable bottling run because we got to see the delicious 2011 Single Vineyard Chardonnays get bottled!  This week was equally as enjoyable as we bottled the 2011 Estate Pinot Noir which by all indications, will be a great bottle of wine.

We are also excited to announce that we have added a new Single Vineyard bottling to the already great lineup of Rosemary’s, Rincon, and Oliver’s Chardonnays.  The 2011 Monte Sereno Chardonnay comes from our smallest vineyard, located just a couple miles west of the winery in the Arroyo Grande appellation.  The 2011 bottling is a blend of the two blocks comprising both clone 548 and clone 4.  The finished wine showcases beautiful tropical aromas and a rich, creamy texture on the palate.  We only made two barrels of this delicious wine, so if you can get your hands on it you’ll be in for a treat!  

 

Time Posted: Feb 15, 2013 at 12:15 PM
Brian Talley, Vintner
 
February 8, 2013 | Brian Talley, Vintner

Winter at the Winery

It’s winter time, which might seem like a slow time around the winery, but that’s not the case.  In reality, some of the most important activities in our winegrowing happen now.

In the vineyard, this is when we prune.  Critical decisions that will affect the crop for this season, as well as subsequent years, are made right now.  It all depends on how many buds we leave on the vine.  More buds mean more potential crop, but less vigorous growth.  These decisions are made on a block-by-block basis depending on previous growth and our production goals.  This is an area where quality, focus and attention to detail really pay off, and I’m proud of our vineyard team.  To see a video of pruning, check out our pinot noir pruning video .

In the winery we are focused on nother critical activities.  One of these activities is our assessment of the quality of the previous vintage.  Eric Johnson, Nicole Pope, Travis Monk and I conducted a complete tasting of every wine we produced from the 2012 vintage (more than 150 separate lots) on January 14 and 15.  As we suspected, quality is excellent across the board with juicy approachable wines reminiscent of the highly successful 2005 vintage.

It is during these blind tastings that we first recognize special wines that are likely candidates for our single vineyard bottlings.  Last January, we discovered how much we enjoyed the 2011 Monte Sereno Vineyard Chardonnay and East Rincon Vineyard Pinot Noir; so much so that we decided to release these as separate Single Vineyard Selections for the first time ever.  We bottled only two barrels of each of these—so I anticipate that they will sell out immediately upon release. Enjoy!

Nicole Bertotti Pope, 2010-2014
 

Watch Bottling at Talley Vineyards

Here is a quick look at the 2011 Rosemary’s Chardonnay traveling through the bottling line.

Brian Talley, Vintner
 
January 11, 2013 | Brian Talley, Vintner

New Year, New People

It’s the New Year and we are focused on planning for our 65th year of farming in the Arroyo Grande Valley.  While most of the effort is directed toward things we’ve done many times before, things like pruning, planting schedules and budgets, there are some truly new happenings to announce, especially related to people.

On the vineyard side, I am pleased to announce the appointment of Travis Monk as our new Vineyard Manager.  Travis has worked with us since 2008 when he started in the Tasting Room.  Lucy Parkin was extremely impressed with his work ethic, great attitude and especially his BBQ skills.  After graduating from Cal Poly with a degree in Agricultural Business Management in 2009, Travis joined former Vineyard Manager Kevin Wilkinson as Viticulturalist and was appointed Assistant Vineyard Manager at the end of 2011.  Travis worked closely with Kevin this past year to ensure a seamless transition to his new role.  He oversaw the planting of more than 20 acres of avocados and now turns his attention to the replanting of the Rincon Vineyard, which will start in 2015.  In his spare time, Travis enjoys hunting and golf.  I’ve enjoyed working with Travis and look forward to the new ideas and the commitment to quality that he brings to our vineyard operations.

We’ve added another full time cellar worker in the winery.  Patrick Sigler was one of three harvest interns who helped us during the 2012 harvest.  Pat’s main responsibility was grape sampling, but he proved to be dedicated, conscientious and hardworking in the cellar as well.  Pat just graduated from the Wine and Viticulture program at Cal Poly.  In addition to his studies, he enjoyed much success on the Cal Poly soccer team, scoring the game winning goal against arch rival UCSB in 2011.  Pat was raised in Sonoma County where he was exposed to the wine industry through friends and looks forward to becoming a winemaker someday.

Eric Johnson, Winemaker
 
November 30, 2012 | Eric Johnson, Winemaker

Harvest is Finally Over

Harvest is finally over. Well almost over. Theoretically harvest is over because there are no more early mornings and long work days but the lasting effects of harvest are still present.

Looking inside a barrel with malolatic fermentation

Here at Talley we have a certain affinity with native fermentation both primary and secondary. Primary fermentation is just about wrapped up and we are now beginning secondary fermentation called malolactic fermentation. Simply put, we allow the native lactic acid bacteria to convert the malic acid in the wine to lactic acid.  I like to say that malic acid is the apple acid and lactic acid is the milk acid. Malic acid is more acidic and lactic acid is smoother and is less acidic. Because we do not inoculate, our wines, our secondary fermentations tends to take longer. We allow this to happen in the majority of our wines excluding out Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc and Bishops Peak Chardonnay. The majority of our Chardonnays go through a very slow secondary fermentation with most not finishing until late spring and in some years, early summer. 

Special fermentation bung allows gas to escape without letting air in.

So why are we doing this? Well first off we want the malic acid converted to lactic acid for the mouth feel. Secondly, we let malolactic fermentation happen intentionally so it doesn’t happen unintentionally in the bottle when it gets to your house. If you have ever had an “active” fermentation occur in bottle, you know it is not a fun wine to drink. Stale beer comes to mind when I think of this.

I didn’t write this to teach everyone about secondary fermentation but to explain that once the harvest is over, it’s not really over.

Nicole Bertotti Pope, 2010-2014
 

Harvest Continues Nonstop

Wow, it’s already October, which means we have been harvesting for over a month now!   Almost daily picks of Pinot Noir kept us busy all September, with the sorting table and destemmer going nonstop.  The winery has been at capacity, with fermentors of grape must in every open corner, and hand punchdowns happening nonstop.  Now that many of the Pinot fermentations have been finishing up,   we’ve been able to start pressing dry lots and racking them to barrel, where they can finish malo-lactic fermentation and give us a chance to start focusing on the Chardonnay.

With last weekend’s heat wave, many of our Rosemary’s and Oliver’s Chardonnay blocks got just the push they needed to finish ripening.   As the seemingly endless bins of Chardonnay arrive we will send them straight to the presses to be whole cluster pressed and then put straight to barrel for fermentation.  

During hot weather weeks like this, we really see what a difference it makes that our vineyard crews hand harvest at night.   On big pick days the crews will start anywhere from 8 PM to midnight and continue until sunrise, delivering beautiful, cool fruit that’s ready to be processed at the winery.   Big thanks to the vineyard crews for all their hard work and crazy hours to get us the best fruit possible!

Time Posted: Oct 5, 2012 at 10:30 AM
Brian Talley, Vintner
 
September 21, 2012 | Brian Talley, Vintner

2012 Dream Harvest--Perfect weather, a great team and the right tools

So far harvest 2012 looks like a dream come true.  After the vintages of 2010 and 2011, which featured excellent quality, but lower yields, 2012 looks to be one of those very special years that combines exceptional quality and good production, especially for pinot noir.  Best of all, the weather forecast for the next few weeks looks just like what we've had for the past two months--highs in the mid to upper 70s.

While weather is important to the quality of the finished wines, the key role that our production team plays can't be understated.  Winemaker Eric Johnson has been with us 5 years and has come to know the characteristics that make each of our vineyards special and unique.  He is ably assisted by Assistant Winemaker Nicole Pope, Cellarmaster Ignacio Zarate (who just celebrated 30 years in our family farming operations), Nicole Morris and a great team of Cal Poly interns.


The vineyard team is charged with farming our vineyards and ensuring that the grapes are harvested as gently and efficiently as possible.  This team is lead by Vineyard Manager Kevin Wilkinson and Travis Monk, who will assume the role of Vineyard Manager after this harvest. Longtime Vineyard Foreman Daniel Martinez leads a dedicated and experienced vineyard crew during late night and early morning harvests to ensure that the grapes arrive at the winery early and cool.

The final element that will make the wines of 2012 so special is the deployment of the right tools to capture all of the potential quality of the vintage.  These include a state-of-the-art destemmer that very gently removes the grapes from the stems, vibrating tables that allow for careful sorting of clusters and individual berries, and a stainless steel basket press that gently extracts the wine from the skins. 


Perfect weather, a great team, and all the right tools--it all adds up to what I believe will be a very special vintage.

Brian Talley, Vintner
 
September 7, 2012 | Brian Talley, Vintner

Harvest Kicks Off

Regular readers of the Winegrower’s Blog might point out that Winemaker Eric Johnson announced the start of harvest in his August 17 post.  Indeed, we harvested two small lots of pinot noir for a rosé and a sparkling wine.  Both of these wines are made in a low alcohol, clean crisp style that calls for harvest much earlier than for our classically styled pinot noir.  Removing these two outliners from the equation, our harvest started about 1 week later than it has over the past 2 years.

If you visit the winery now, you can watch our cellar crew making wine, but you will be hard pressed to see anyone harvesting grapes.  This is because almost all of our harvesting is done at night.  This keeps the grapes as cool as possible and also helps with harvest flow because the first grapes are already at the winery when the winemaking team arrives in the morning.

Many people ask me, “how is 2012?”  It’s a very simple question, but the answer unfolds over time as we gather more information.  Here’s what I can say now.  Because this was a relatively dry growing season, we’ve experienced less mildew and botrytis pressure than normal.  This generally implies better quality.  The crop is about average in size for chardonnay, and above average for pinot noir.  I sum it up as “good quality, good crop.”  We will have a much better idea after we’ve harvested more and the first wines go dry. 

In January, when we conduct our first extensive tastings of the vintage, we can draw more conclusions.  Finally, in the late spring of 2013, we will conduct the tastings that will determine the Single Vineyard Selections and the Estate wines for the vintage.  That’s when I can more definitively answer the question “how was 2012?”

If you want another person’s perspective of our 2010 vintage wines, I invite you to check out the Wine Advocate Reviews that just came out.

Andy McDaniel, 2007-2013
 
August 31, 2012 | Andy McDaniel, 2007-2013

Do You Put Rosemary in the Wine?

I probably shouldn’t include this one in my top ten list of over-used phrases in the tasting room. I hear very similar questions almost every day, about whether the blueberries, strawberries, and buttered biscuit are actually added to the wine. I only include this in the over-used list because lots of people ask just to be facetious, and it certainly doesn’t help that we have tons of rosemary planted in our parking area. When someone asks this question seriously, it’s awesome because it gives me the opportunity to completely enlighten a customer about the world of wine. This is all the more rewarding this time of year because I have the ability to actually show guests the winemaking process from beginning to end without them having to visualize it.

For me, harvest is the time of year when I can give my voice a rest and let the winery do the talking. Harvest tours are perfect for explaining the process because every step is going on at the same time. One batch of pinot noir is being sorted while another is just beginning to ferment. Chardonnay and pinot noir are being pressed, though one is releasing juice from the skins and another is turning into wine. Why stop with the sights and smells? If there is fruit, juice, or wine to be tasted on tours – then we will certainly taste.  How better to learn about fermentation than to taste the juice before, and the wine after? You may ask why malolactic fermentation and barrel aging is important in many wines? Put your glass under the press and catch a little pinot noir on its first day of being wine to find out.

Be careful, however, on harvest tours – you might just be put to work! “Learn by doing” as they say at Cal Poly, is the second best way to learn about wine other than tasting. You might be convinced to do a few punch-downs or even try your hand at sorting clusters. Don’t worry – I won’t make anyone wash any harvest bins or clean out any tanks – we’ll leave that up to the pros. If nothing else, you’ll learn that Rosemary is a person and that none of the herb is used in our wine production.