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Winegrower's Blog

Andy McDaniel, Guest Services Coordinator
 

How Well do you Know the Tasting Room Staff?

To start, I’ve been told that I have a fluffy and lengthy style of writing – so if you want to get to the meat, scroll down to find a game that could win you a prize!

Continuing the tradition of the most frequently used phrases in the tasting room, my line for this week is “How long have you been at Talley Vineyards?”  I usually can determine that they are asking about me personally, but I like to play dumb and tell people that Talley Farms has been in business since 1948 and Talley Vineyards was established in 1982. “Oh, you meant me personally?” I finally tell them that I’ve been here since the summer of 2007.

Almost everyone that comes in to the tasting room seems to be interested in knowing about their servers, which we encourage by having enough staff so that we can really make connections with our customers. If you are what we jokingly refer to as a “frequent flyer,” you may very well know a little bit about all 18 tasting room attendants. That’s right, 18, and all with very unique personalities.

Below, you will find a column with 8 different tasting room attendants and a column with 8 different facts about each of these attendants. The first to match all 8 correctly will win a private winery and vineyard tour for 4 people! Just cut and paste the table below into an email and send your answers to andy@talleyvineyards.com

Staff Contest - Match the Staff Member to their Fact

1. Sharon 4. Mike 7. Sarah
2. Jane 5. Marian 8. Lucy
3. Bobby 6. Dick  
STAFF  No. FACTS
  A.       Worked for thirty years as a school teacher and gives tours at Talley Vineyards
  B.       Our Tasting Room Manager who has been at Talley Vineyards for over nine years
  C.       One of two attendants who work on Mondays and match their outfits, also our lead tasting room attendant
  D.       Has worked at Talley Vineyards for over 20 years and considered our “tasting room mom”
  E.        One of two attendants who work on Mondays and match their outfits, also our in-house chef
  F.        Runs in marathons including the 2011 Boston and Big Sur Marathons
 

G.       Is a retired doctor and drives to Talley Vineyards weekly from Cambria

  H.       Aspires to be a Brewmaster and brings a new beer for the staff to try almost every Saturday

 

Brian Talley, Vintner
 
September 21, 2012 | Brian Talley, Vintner

2012 Dream Harvest--Perfect weather, a great team and the right tools

So far harvest 2012 looks like a dream come true.  After the vintages of 2010 and 2011, which featured excellent quality, but lower yields, 2012 looks to be one of those very special years that combines exceptional quality and good production, especially for pinot noir.  Best of all, the weather forecast for the next few weeks looks just like what we've had for the past two months--highs in the mid to upper 70s.

While weather is important to the quality of the finished wines, the key role that our production team plays can't be understated.  Winemaker Eric Johnson has been with us 5 years and has come to know the characteristics that make each of our vineyards special and unique.  He is ably assisted by Assistant Winemaker Nicole Pope, Cellarmaster Ignacio Zarate (who just celebrated 30 years in our family farming operations), Nicole Morris and a great team of Cal Poly interns.


The vineyard team is charged with farming our vineyards and ensuring that the grapes are harvested as gently and efficiently as possible.  This team is lead by Vineyard Manager Kevin Wilkinson and Travis Monk, who will assume the role of Vineyard Manager after this harvest. Longtime Vineyard Foreman Daniel Martinez leads a dedicated and experienced vineyard crew during late night and early morning harvests to ensure that the grapes arrive at the winery early and cool.

The final element that will make the wines of 2012 so special is the deployment of the right tools to capture all of the potential quality of the vintage.  These include a state-of-the-art destemmer that very gently removes the grapes from the stems, vibrating tables that allow for careful sorting of clusters and individual berries, and a stainless steel basket press that gently extracts the wine from the skins. 


Perfect weather, a great team, and all the right tools--it all adds up to what I believe will be a very special vintage.

Anna Heacock, Marketing
 
September 14, 2012 | Anna Heacock, Marketing

Talley Vineyards is in Arroyo Grande Valley, San Luis Obispo County, California

It’s been quite a year for Talley Vineyards in the press.  If you’re our friend on Facebook, follow our Twitter feed or read this blog, I’m sure you’ve seen some of the fantastic accolades our wines have garnered this year.  It seems that there is a consensus in the trade that our wines are “ageworthy”, “world-class” and according to a recent Food and Wine Magazine article, Talley Vineyards is one of the “World’s Most Trustworthy Wineries”.  With all that in mind, I have to pose the question…Why doesn’t anyone know where we’re located?

For the record, Talley Vineyards is located in Arroyo Grande, California.  I get it, Arroyo Grande is a fly-over city, but so was Anaheim before Walt built Disneyland.  I’m not suggesting Talley Vineyards is a destination like Disneyland, but it is a special place. Our terrior, the sense of a place that influences and shapes our wines, has been nationally recognized by some of the most highly regarded names in the wine industry.  With that in mind, I think it’s important that people understand where we are located in order to better appreciate what environmental influences are contributing to our wines. And equally important, so they can visit us!

When most people think of California wine growing regions they think of Napa and Sonoma. Some may know about Monterey and Santa Barbara Counties. The very savvy are familiar with Paso Robles.  But where exactly does that leave Talley Vineyards?  I’ll tell you where.  Halfway between Los Angeles and San Francisco, more specifically halfway between Santa Barbara and Paso Robles, sits San Luis Obispo County’s tiny little coastal town of Arroyo Grande Valley, home of Talley Vineyards, where we grow world class chardonnay and pinot noir.  So next time you hear about Talley Vineyards, we hope you think of us here at home in the Arroyo Grande Valley.

 
Brian Talley, Vintner
 
September 7, 2012 | Brian Talley, Vintner

Harvest Kicks Off

Regular readers of the Winegrower’s Blog might point out that Winemaker Eric Johnson announced the start of harvest in his August 17 post.  Indeed, we harvested two small lots of pinot noir for a rosé and a sparkling wine.  Both of these wines are made in a low alcohol, clean crisp style that calls for harvest much earlier than for our classically styled pinot noir.  Removing these two outliners from the equation, our harvest started about 1 week later than it has over the past 2 years.

If you visit the winery now, you can watch our cellar crew making wine, but you will be hard pressed to see anyone harvesting grapes.  This is because almost all of our harvesting is done at night.  This keeps the grapes as cool as possible and also helps with harvest flow because the first grapes are already at the winery when the winemaking team arrives in the morning.

Many people ask me, “how is 2012?”  It’s a very simple question, but the answer unfolds over time as we gather more information.  Here’s what I can say now.  Because this was a relatively dry growing season, we’ve experienced less mildew and botrytis pressure than normal.  This generally implies better quality.  The crop is about average in size for chardonnay, and above average for pinot noir.  I sum it up as “good quality, good crop.”  We will have a much better idea after we’ve harvested more and the first wines go dry. 

In January, when we conduct our first extensive tastings of the vintage, we can draw more conclusions.  Finally, in the late spring of 2013, we will conduct the tastings that will determine the Single Vineyard Selections and the Estate wines for the vintage.  That’s when I can more definitively answer the question “how was 2012?”

If you want another person’s perspective of our 2010 vintage wines, I invite you to check out the Wine Advocate Reviews that just came out.