Cart 0 items: $0.00

Close

Qty Item Description Price Total
  SubTotal $0.00

View Cart

 

Winegrower's Blog

Anna Heacock, Marketing
 
July 26, 2013 | Anna Heacock, Marketing

Someone Else's Memories

Over the past couple of weeks, I have been busy archiving and assembling the pieces to a very extensive, permanent timeline display for our Rincon Room.  (Will be ready by September).    I have been digging in the basement, rummaging through closets and emptying cupboards in search of forgotten piles of newspaper clippings and old photographs.  What I didn’t anticipate, was how much fun it would be to stumble across so many keepsakes of milestone events, both for the Talley Family and the winery.

I’m pretty sentimental, so my favorite part has been going through all the old pictures.  Much like how you think your parents didn’t exist before you did- that’s kinda how it was for me and Talley Vineyards.  Hard to imagine that Talley had already been up and running for over 20 years before I started here, 6 years ago.  Now I have a more complete view and appreciation for their history as wine industry pioneers in the area.

I wanted to share with you some of my favorite pictures.

Don and Rosemary Talley in front of the Adobe in the early 1990’s.
Don Talley mid-punch down from one of our first harvests, circa 1986 or 87
Brian and Johnine Talley at the first San Luis Obispo Vintner’s festival in 1994
Tasting Room being built in 2002

 

Anna Heacock, Marketing
 
April 8, 2013 | Anna Heacock, Marketing

Getting Fresh with Your Farmer

So I’ll just assume that you’ve heard about the Talley Farms Fresh Harvest program.  (If not http://talleyfarmsfreshharvest.com )  Being part of this very inspiring produce program for almost a year now, I’ve started thinking different about dinner, and also where it comes from.  I’ve noticed I’m not the only one.

After the last few decades of growing ingenuity in the food industry to produce more processed and genetically modified foods in large corporate facilities, the pendulum has really begun to swing the other way in the foodie culture.  There has been a significant boom in the “eating local” movement, and with that, a public interest in supporting and meeting their local farmers and ranchers.  I, along with the other 1,000 or so members that get a weekly Fresh Harvest box definitely fall into this category.

It’s my opinion that the wine industry initiated this way of thinking. For years, wine drinkers have willingly been inundated with information about terroir, vineyard practices, and the farming ethics that all contribute to the differing profiles of their wines.  General interest in this topic has been piqued and it’s only natural that it would translate to food and other products.  But really, who would have ever guessed that a discussion about soil, irrigation, and pesticides would be so necessary- especially at meal time? 

Recently, there have been several new food and wine events created in an effort to bring the public closer to their local growers.  This month alone, there are two major events here on the Central Coast that aim to put farmers, wineries, and consumers together.  Talley Vineyards will be participating in both. 

First, we will be attending the Earth Day Food and Wine Festival on April 20th up at Pomar Junction in Paso Robles http://earthdayfoodandwine.com.  This very hip annual event celebrates everything food and wine with a focus on sustainable, bio-dynamic, and organic.  Second, we will be participating in the first annual Farmfest at the Dinosaur Caves Park in Shell Beach http://www.slowine.com/events/farmfest.php.  This event will feature over 25 wineries and an unprecedented number of local producers from Central Coast Creamery to our own Talley Farms Fresh Harvest! 

At Talley Vineyards, and now Talley Farms, we’re always eager for an opportunity to educate.   Hopefully you too will have the chance to attend these events and “shake the hand that feeds you”.

Anna Heacock, Marketing
 
March 1, 2013 | Anna Heacock, Marketing

WOPN

This weekend is WOPN! World of Pinot Noir is the must-attend event for any serious pinot noir enthusiast.  This experience features hundreds of pinot noirs from all over the globe through seminars, walk-around tastings and dinner events.  Renowned producers of this coveted varietal pour tastes of their current release wines at the grand tastings, while rare and old vintage wines are usually poured in special seminars and dinners.  As an added bonus, the event is primarily held on the bluff in Shell Beach at both the Dolphin Bay and Cliffs Resorts, overlooking the beautiful Pacific Ocean.  (Oh, and Brian Talley was one of the founders of this event!)

This year, Talley Vineyards will be the focus of one of the educational “breakout sessions”.  This sold-out seminar will feature Rosemary’s and Rincon Vineyard wines from 2007-2010.  It is my opinion that these wines are some of the best we’ve ever made, and now is a wonderful time to taste them side by side.  Many pinot noirs have a relatively short shelf life, but the Talley wines are known for their exceptional ageability.  Our pinot noirs show incredible structure and depth and can begin peaking more than 4-5 years after bottling.  Brian Talley and Eric Johnson will be hosting this special event and discussing what is unique about each vintage and what contributes to the beauty of these wines today.

If you want to taste as many pinot noirs as possible, I recommend going to both the Friday and Saturday afternoon tastings.   Each day features a different group of wineries. If you haven’t bought your tickets yet, it’s not too late.  You can still purchase them at http://www.worldofpinotnoir.com.  This event provides the opportunity to enjoy the many variations of this wonderful varietal in a fun, educational and beautiful environment.

Anna Heacock, Marketing
 
January 25, 2013 | Anna Heacock, Marketing

Mano Tinta Artist Label Competition

It is my pleasure to announce that this March, Talley Vineyards will be hosting the sixth annual Mano Tinta revolving artist label competition.  For those of you unfamiliar, Mano Tinta is a charity wine produced through a community effort wherein all the grapes, packaging and labor to make the wine is donated and the artwork for the label is created by the local community through this competition.  The vibrant and creative labels from the past few vintages of the Mano Tinta wine have featured a variety of colorful images, all symbolic of the vineyard worker and their craft. 

This competition is open to the general public and will be on display for public viewing and voting in the Talley Vineyards tasting room throughout the month of March.  We encourage local artists of all ages and levels of experience to submit their artwork to the Talley Vineyards tasting room anytime through the end of March.  Submissions must be accompanied by a completed entry form and should be original and meaningful.  The winner will be announced within the first week of April and will have their artwork showcased on the 2010 Mano Tinta label, website, t-shirts and posters.  Entry forms and specific guidelines can be found listed below or by contacting anna@talleyvineyards.com.

Mano Tinta Label Competition Guidelines and Form


The profits raised from the sales of this wine are donated to the Fund for Vineyard and Farm Workers; an endowment created by Brian and Johnine Talley that benefits organizations utilized by the vineyard and farm workers of all San Luis Obispo County.   For additional information about the competition or The Fund For Vineyard and Farm Workers, please call (805) 489-0446 or visit us at www.talleyvineyards.com.

Time Posted: Jan 25, 2013 at 10:12 AM
Anna Heacock, Marketing
 
January 4, 2013 | Anna Heacock, Marketing

Restaurant Month in California

As a way to encourage dining out during an otherwise slow time of year, California celebrates January as “Restaurant Month”.  Each participating restaurant creates a generous fixed price menu offering 3 courses for $30. This is a fantastic opportunity to get in on some incredible culinary values, particularly in some restaurants where that’s less than the cost of just one entrée.

I can’t speak for what happens in other counties, but in San Luis Obispo there’s an added bonus of wineries partnering with these restaurants.  In most cases this means that for a small additional fee, the restaurants will offer either a flight of wines or individual glasses to complement each course.  For the most part, these added wine pairings are designed to be as great of a bargain as the meals so you have the chance to taste some incredible, and in some cases rare wines, all for a nominal price.

This brings me to the Talley Vineyards tie-in… I’m in marketing, can you blame me?  We are delighted to share that we are partnered with the fabulous Marisol Restaurant at The Cliffs Resort in Shell Beach. They are well known on the Central Coast for their exquisite food prepared by Chef Greg Wangard in a beautifully scenic location perched right on the cliffs of Shell Beach.  This month only, for $30 you can choose from a large selection of gourmet appetizers, entrées, and desserts for each course that pair perfectly with some delicious Talley Estate wines.  Check out this link to see their complete menu,  but I highly recommend the beef short ribs with our Talley Vineyards Estate Pinot Noir, the best I’ve ever had!

Anna Heacock, Marketing
 
December 7, 2012 | Anna Heacock, Marketing

A Company Christmas Party, Talley Style

Last night we had our annual Talley staff Christmas party at Giuseppe’s Restaurant in Pismo Beach- and no, the night didn’t end with karaoke.  As you can imagine, this is an exceptionally fun event where we have the amazing opportunity to taste a wide variety of rare, old vintages of Talley single vineyard wines.  Even better, the wines are all from large format bottles which are not only festive, but are known to age better than small format bottles.  The only difficult part is pacing oneself enough to fully appreciate what you’re tasting.

We kicked off the night with a 5 liter bottle of 2001 Rosemary’s Vineyard Chardonnay- which in the words of our direct sales manager Alyssa Ball, “Smelled and tasted rich, nutty, and delicious like a perfectly aged chardonnay”.    I totally agree with her, and I’ll add that it was a wonderful complement to the creamy stuffed mushroom appetizer they were serving.  That bottle disappeared pretty quickly (there were a lot of us), so we moved on to another 5 liter bottle, the 2007 Rincon Chardonnay.  The Rincon was surprisingly fresh and citrusy, showing very youthful.  If you have this wine in your cellar, it is drinking well now, but it definitely has a lot of years left to age.

So, with dinner on the way, we needed to fill our seats and our glasses- this time with a few pinot noirs.  It was a moment I was waiting for, the ceremonious opening of the 9 Liter bottle of 2001 Rincon Vineyard Pinot Noir.  We recently revisited this wine in our library tastings and I remember it scoring top rankings.  The larger format bottle didn’t seem to differ from its 750 ml equivalent.  It had very distinctive earthy characteristics, and the palate was silky and smooth. 

Since I don’t have room to fill in the details about all the wines we shared, I would like to finish with the highlight of my evening, the 1999 Rosemary’s Vineyard Pinot Noir.  This wine had bright and distinctive fruit with perfectly balanced acidity and a silky, tannin structure.  This delicate yet robust pinot noir is still a star after roughly 12 years in bottle. 

Once again, I was reminded of what a wonderful producer we work for.  Even though those incredible wines were all made before my time at Talley Vineyards, it was very special to get to experience these vintages with the family that produced them.

 
Anna Heacock, Marketing
 
November 9, 2012 | Anna Heacock, Marketing

Don't Take My Word For It

Thanksgiving always gets me thinking about food, and thinking about food always gets me thinking about wine.  Turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes…pinot noir, chardonnay, riesling, there’s a lot of great choices on this annual day of total over-indulgence.  Recently the whole staff at Talley Vineyards was asked what wines they’ll be bringing to Thanksgiving dinner.  I have my own ideas, but this really got me thinking, what IS the best wine for this unique dinner? —What do the sommeliers recommend?

I met with Todd Brown, Sommelier at Lido, Dolphin Bay Resort in Shell Beach and he had a lot to say about this topic. Todd points out, “The problem is that we don’t serve Thanksgiving Day dinner in courses where we can pair each dish with a different wine.  With all the dishes and condiments on the table we pass the plate and load up on a little bit of everything all at once.”   So with that in mind, I asked him what the best solution would be- and I really liked what he had to say. 
He recommends a ½ glass of Rosemary’s Pinot Noir AND a ½ glass of Rosemary’s Chardonnay. (I’ll take a full glass of each, thank you.)

Todd explained that the Talley wines are a great choice because of their balance, particularly their higher acid, lower alcohol and mild tannins that enhance the flavors of food so well.  He says “The higher acidity in the wine lets it pair with heavier, starchier foods like potatoes and turkey with dressing.  The lower alcohol doesn’t over-exert itself and mask the flavors of the food.”  Todd explains that there’s a necessity for both wines because chardonnay and pinot noir go great with turkey.  The oaky, yet crisp elements of chardonnay are great with starches while pinot noir’s earthiness is a best bet for complementing vegetable sides like brussel sprouts and green beans as well as the fruitiness of cranberry sauce. 

So take this for what it’s worth, but most importantly don’t limit yourself. I would like to thank Todd for his insights, but mostly for his permission to open 2 bottles of Rosemary’s Vineyard wines.

Anna Heacock, Marketing
 
October 12, 2012 | Anna Heacock, Marketing

In Case You Missed It...

This past summer Brian Talley packed his bags and set out to meet with some of the top food and wine writers in the country to share our 25 year portfolio of chardonnays.  This precarious mission to meet with these most discerning reviewers and host a retrospective tasting has proven to be an incredible success.  Over the past few months, numerous articles have surfaced in magazines and around the web about the true age worthiness of our wines.  One of the most flattering in our recent accolades was when Food and Wine Magazine named Talley Vineyards as one of “The World’s Most Trustworthy Wineries”.   We’ve been regularly sharing this press with our friends on Facebook, but just in case you missed it, here are a few exciting highlights of what the experts had to say:

  • I would confidently put any of the Talley wines toe-to-toe with Grand Cru French Burgundy.  Talley’s wines definitely made a statement; not all California Chardonnays are equal, and California Chardonnays crafted in a classical style and grown in cooler climates deserve a second look. They also merit a place in your cellar, to be savored today and twenty years from now.- Katie Kelley Bell, Forbes
     
  • Talleys wines don’t have to be old to taste good. We also tasted five delicious Chardonnays that were brand new. The important thing about these wines is that they have generous acidity and restrained fruit. In other words, they are far more reminiscent of a European wine. - Austin Chronicle
     
  • Made in a Burgundian-style with an emphasis on the vineyards and creating a true sense of place, instead of manipulation in the winery, Talley Vineyards succeeds in delivering a lively white filled with citrus and stone fruit notes, balanced with layers of spice and nuttiness. Enjoy a bottle young, and then let one age for a few years and you’ll see the flavors develop into rich caramel notes while maintaining the acidity and brightness of the fruit. - Hayley Hamilton
     
  • The two best surprises came from the oldest bottle we tasted, the 1994 Talley’s Vineyard, as well as the 2001 Rosemary’s Vineyard which both maintained their consistency in structure, balance and acidity, proving that these wines could easily continue to age an additional number of years. – D Magazine
     
  • Talley remains one of the great estates in California that has yet to be fully discovered. As a result, prices remain exceedingly fair considering the quality of what goes into the bottle. - Antonio Galloni, The Wine Advocate
Time Posted: Oct 12, 2012 at 9:45 AM
Anna Heacock, Marketing
 
September 14, 2012 | Anna Heacock, Marketing

Talley Vineyards is in Arroyo Grande Valley, San Luis Obispo County, California

It’s been quite a year for Talley Vineyards in the press.  If you’re our friend on Facebook, follow our Twitter feed or read this blog, I’m sure you’ve seen some of the fantastic accolades our wines have garnered this year.  It seems that there is a consensus in the trade that our wines are “ageworthy”, “world-class” and according to a recent Food and Wine Magazine article, Talley Vineyards is one of the “World’s Most Trustworthy Wineries”.  With all that in mind, I have to pose the question…Why doesn’t anyone know where we’re located?

For the record, Talley Vineyards is located in Arroyo Grande, California.  I get it, Arroyo Grande is a fly-over city, but so was Anaheim before Walt built Disneyland.  I’m not suggesting Talley Vineyards is a destination like Disneyland, but it is a special place. Our terrior, the sense of a place that influences and shapes our wines, has been nationally recognized by some of the most highly regarded names in the wine industry.  With that in mind, I think it’s important that people understand where we are located in order to better appreciate what environmental influences are contributing to our wines. And equally important, so they can visit us!

When most people think of California wine growing regions they think of Napa and Sonoma. Some may know about Monterey and Santa Barbara Counties. The very savvy are familiar with Paso Robles.  But where exactly does that leave Talley Vineyards?  I’ll tell you where.  Halfway between Los Angeles and San Francisco, more specifically halfway between Santa Barbara and Paso Robles, sits San Luis Obispo County’s tiny little coastal town of Arroyo Grande Valley, home of Talley Vineyards, where we grow world class chardonnay and pinot noir.  So next time you hear about Talley Vineyards, we hope you think of us here at home in the Arroyo Grande Valley.

 
Anna Heacock, Marketing
 
July 20, 2012 | Anna Heacock, Marketing

Riesling with Breakfast

Believe it or not, Mimosas and Bloody Marys aren’t the only beverages that can be enjoyed with brunch!  A few years ago I was fortunate enough to attend a food and wine pairing seminar that featured a variety of creative wine pairings for common breakfast items such as oatmeal and a Jimmy Dean breakfast sandwich!  That experience made me realize that wine pairing isn’t just for dinner.   So, with summer upon us and fresh white wines tasting so delicious, I thought I’d share a little idea I had for the next time you feel inspired at breakfast. 

Bishop’s Peak Riesling paired with Salmon Scramble (scramble recipe from Rachel Ray)

Ingredients - (Serves 6)

1/4 pound sliced smoked salmon
12 eggs
1/2 cup heavy cream
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons butter
12 to 15 blades of fresh chives, finely chopped
*Creamy goat cheese and/or dill would make a delicious addition to this recipe

Directions

Reserve 2 slices of salmon for garnish. Chop the remaining salmon into very small pieces.
Whisk your eggs and cream together. Add 1/2 of your chopped chives and season eggs with salt and pepper. Preheat a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Melt butter in the pan and add eggs. Scramble eggs with a wooden spoon. Do not cook eggs until dry. When eggs have come together but remain wet, stir in chopped salmon. Remove pan from the stove and place on a trivet. Garnish the eggs with remaining salmon and chives and serve right out of the warm pan.

Pour yourself a glass of Riesling and enjoy!