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Brian Talley, Vintner
 
August 24, 2012 | Harvest, Production, Wine Making | Brian Talley, Vintner

Pressing Concerns

Harvest is just around the corner and I thought I this would be a great time to discuss one of the most important pieces of equipment at the winery.  The wine press is used to extract juice (in the case of white wine) or wine (for red) from the grapes.  We have a number of presses at the winery.  Here’s an introduction to each, from smallest to largest.  Winemaker Eric Johnson is in each picture to lend perspective.

Ethan’s Press—this small press belongs to Ethan Etnyre, local doctor, friend of the winery and home winemaker.  His wife Karen gave it to him a few years ago as a gift.  Ethan has determined that he prefers to bring the grapes he grows at his house to Talley Vineyards to be pressed, so we accommodate him.  Consequently, this press doesn’t get much use.  Maybe we’ll use it for a micro batch this year, just for fun.

Traditional Basket Press—This small basket press was recently restored by my friend Stan Shahan, who also happens to be a home winemaker.  It now stands near the front door of the tasting room and is a real showpiece.  Like all traditional basket presses, it employs a steel plate that is ratcheted down from the top, applying pressure to the must (crushed red grapes).  The basket consists of slats of oak.  The wine runs into a steel channel at the bottom, then into a bucket or other small container.

New Basket Press—This is Winemaker Eric Johnson’s pride and joy.  It is the state-of-the-art press used in the production of many of the best red wines produced in the world, including our single vineyard pinot noirs.  It works with the same principle as the traditional wood basket press, though employs a hydraulic ram (as opposed to a hand rachet system).  It is also made of stainless steel.  This press yields beautiful clear red wine with soft tannins.

Europress—This is a tank press.  While the basket press is ideal for red wine production, this is perfect for white wine, especially chardonnay.  All of our chardonnay is whole cluster pressed, which yields clean juice with good acid balance and little phenolic bitterness. Whole clusters of grapes are loaded into the press, through doors at the top.  Inside the press is a giant bag that inflates with air.  The juice runs into the pan at the bottom of the press before being pumped into a tank.  Check out this video on operating the press taken in 2009, back when Eric Johnson, now winemaker, was the enologist at Talley Vineyards. 

Comments

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www.creativebioscience.com
@ Feb 15, 2013 at 6:49 AM
For consistency, non-vintage wines can be blended from more than one vintage, which helps winemakers sustain a reliable market image and maintain sales even in bad years. One recent study suggests that for the average wine drinker, the vintage year may not be as significant for perceived quality as had been thought, although wine connoisseurs continue to place great importance on it. Thanks.

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